Welsh council parking profits up for third year 17 Nov 2016

Profits from parking up 14% year-on-year

Local authorities in Wales made a combined surplus – or ‘profit’ - of £13.8 million on their parking activities in the last financial year. 

The figure for 2015-16 was a 14% increase on the £12.1 million surplus made in 2014-15.

Between them, the 22 councils in Wales had parking income of £35.8 million in 2015-16, a rise of 5.6% on the previous financial year. Income includes on- and off-street parking charges and penalty charges.

Total expenditure on running parking activities was £22 million, a 0.9% increase on the previous financial year.

The total surplus is the difference between the income and expenditure figures.

The rise in surplus is the third annual increase in a row and a 60% increase on the figure for 2012-13 (£8.6 million).

Table 1: Welsh council parking accounts summary

 

 £million

2011-12

2012-13

2013-4

2014-15

2015-16

Change 2015-16 on

2014-15

Parking

Income

30.3

30.4

32.3

33.9

35.8

5.6%

 

Expenditure

21.1

21.8

22.5

21.8

22.0

0.9%

 

Surplus (‘profit’)

9.2

8.6

9.8

12.1

13.8

14.2%

 

The data analysed by the RAC Foundation comes from the official returns made in a standardised format to the Welsh Government on an annual basis. 

Looked at individually, 19 of the 22 councils showed surpluses.

(Full table of councils follows below.)

The biggest ‘profit’ was made by Cardiff (£3.5 million), followed by Swansea (£2.4 million) and then Gwynedd (£1.4 million).

Three councils reported losses on their parking activities: Flintshire (£423,000), Blaenau Gwent (£310,000) and Torfaen (£81,000).

The most ‘efficient’ council was Monmouthshire where the ratio of income (£1.42 million) to expenditure (£490,000) was 2.9.

Table 2: Welsh councils ranked by level of 2015-16 parking surplus

 

 

 Surplus (£000)

 

 £000

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

Change

2014-15 on

2015-16

1

Cardiff

2,788

2,586

2,924

3,426

3,494

2%

2

Swansea

1,426

1,256

1,256

1,951

2,402

23%

3

Gwynedd

692

804

797

927

1,408

52%

4

Carmarthenshire

387

487

795

790

1,394

76%

5

Conwy

458

560

580

659

1,058

61%

6

Monmouthshire

719

461

585

741

931

26%

7

Powys

245

358

436

616

839

36%

8

Pembrokeshire

262

264

376

492

583

18%

9

Rhondda Cynon Taf

353

478

393

545

497

-9%

10

Denbighshire

741

677

541

484

458

-5%

11

Wrexham

520

240

306

465

316

-32%

12

Bridgend

436

300

496

111

232

108%

13

Neath Port Talbot

283

247

245

186

208

12%

14

Caerphilly

232

162

211

198

190

-4%

15

Isle of Anglesey

51

55

85

157

186

18%

16

Merthyr Tydfil

137

340

201

93

171

83%

17

Newport

-191

-206

16

65

137

113%

18

Vale of Glamorgan

-123

-238

53

151

108

-28%

19

Ceredigion

351

287

278

325

16

-95%

20

Torfaen

-94

-39

-68

-51

-81

59%

21

Blaenau Gwent

-285

-311

-244

-223

-310

39%

22

Flintshire

-112

-100

-511

-8

-423

4995%

 

Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation, said:

“Overall council parking profits in Wales are up sharply again this year, possibly reflecting a recovering economy with people using their cars more.

“It is important that the surplus is ploughed back into transport projects – there are plenty on Welsh motorists’ wish-lists, not least the ongoing campaign to tackle potholes. 

“Some cash could also go towards providing and maintaining off-street car parks, so that they are seen by drivers as a safe and convenient alternative to finding space at the kerbside. 

“While we don’t want our towns and cities dominated by the car, we must remember how dependent many people still are on them. In several areas of Wales – including Blaenau Gwent, Neath Port Talbot and Torfaen – more than 80% of those in employment rely on the car to get to work, some of the highest proportions in Britain.”

Contact:

Philip Gomm – Head of External Communications – RAC Foundation

philip.gomm@racfoundation.org | 020 7747 3445 | 07711 776448 | 020 7389 0601 (ISDN)

Notes to editors:

The RAC Foundation is a transport policy and research organisation that explores the economic, mobility, safety and environmental issues relating to roads and their users.

The Foundation publishes independent and authoritative research with which it promotes informed debate and advocates policy in the interest of the responsible motorist. All the Foundation’s work is available at: www.racfoundation.org  

Due to the rounding of values, calculations may not sum-up exactly.

The full report is available to download:

www.racfoundation.org/assets/rac_foundation/content/downloadables/Local_authority_parking_finances_Wales 2015-16_Leibling.pdf

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